News

February 27th 2017

Focus On: Royal Marines Cadets

Mansfield Royal Marines Cadets

Some of the Royal Marines Cadets based at Mansfield

You know about Army, Air and Sea Cadets – what about Royal Marines Cadets (RMC)?

The Marine Cadet Section, as it was previously called, was set up to be incorporated into the Sea Cadets Corps in 1955. After receiving the official seal of approval from Her Majesty The Queen, it was officially renamed the RMC in 2011.

In the East Midlands, the Sea Cadet units at Mansfield, Worksop, Lincoln, Derby, Nottingham, South Leicester and Hinckley all have RMCs.

But what do they do that’s different to the Sea Cadets?

We spoke to Joseph Haskew, an adult volunteer who away from working in a warehouse during the day, oversees RMCs at Mansfield.

Joseph was an RMC himself aged 15 to 18. Now aged 20 he’s in charge of the nine cadets at the Mansfield division.

He said: “We run it largely the same as the Sea Cadets and there’s a number of things we share including the opening parade held on parade nights, the leading of which alternates between Sea and Royal Marines Cadets. We do though have separate squads and uniforms.

“The content we cover is similar to the Sea Cadets but we have more specialist learning. Where they focus on seamanship and boats, we still do water activities but like to focus on field craft and skills that would be essential in the field which was what particularly excited me.

“RMCs can go on Sea Cadet camps and vice versa, but whereas the Sea Cadets will do, for example, five days on the water, we will do one day on the water and the rest doing different things including field craft.

“You can also still do what you want to do, including aviation or seafaring. I think being an RMC offers a really nice balance of activities.”

You can become a RMC at the age of 13, a year later than you can become a full Sea Cadet. Mansfield also incorporates Junior Sea Cadets aged 10 to 12. Joseph made the move to become an RMC from the Air Training Corps with a few friends after being impressed at the opportunities offered.

He loved it so much he’s continued his cadet career to become an adult volunteer and now oversees the Mansfield RMCs.

Joseph finds that role even more rewarding than being a cadet himself.

He explains: “The cadets I’ve had the privilege to oversee are a really good group of young people. I look to get them to push each other and work as a team.

“I try and stand aside and let the senior cadets take the lead so it builds their confidence and adds to the teamwork aspect of the detachment.

“To see the cadets grow as they progress is very rewarding for me. It’s a really brilliant feeling, especially when you’re passing on your own knowledge.”

For more information on the RMC click here

“To see the cadets grow as they progress is very rewarding for me. It’s a really brilliant feeling, especially when you’re passing on your own knowledge.”