News

September 6th 2016

“I always strive to do a first class job”

Maj Kenny Thompson

A reservist who has been serving with the Armed Forces for over two decades is set to wear his uniform in to his Sutton-in-Ashfield-based workplace to mark Reserves Day this year.

Major Kenny Thompson, aged 54, serves with the Army Reserve’s 212 Field Hospital in Sheffield, and works as an Advanced Clinical Practitioner in Emergency Medicine at King’s Mill Hospital in his civilian career.

Reserves Day is taking place on 8 September and is an opportunity for reservists to wear their military uniform into their civilian workplace to raise awareness about the important role reservists play in supporting the UK’s Defence capability.

Explaining more about why he wanted to take part in the event, Kenny said: “I feel a sense of duty to promote the Reserve Forces and provide as much background information as I can to others who may be thinking of joining the Army Reserve. The Reserve Forces have so much to offer, and you can take part in a variety of clinical courses that are transferable to the NHS that can help you to strengthen your clinical diversity.”

Since Kenny joined 212 Field Hospital in 1994 he has taken part in operational tours to Iraq, where he was a shift leader in the British Army’s emergency department and been deployed to Afghanistan twice, as well as travelling throughout the UK and to Italy, Spain, France and Corsica as an Army Reserve Senior Climbing Instructor.

Kenny continued: “Specialising in emergency medicine in my civilian career means that I treat patients of all ages who have a wide range of clinical problems. I examine, prescribe and refer them to the appropriate clinical discipline, or discharge them as appropriate. This is a huge responsibility and I always strive to do a first class job.”

Maj Kenny Thompson

Maj Kenny Thompson

Keeping calm, being 100% professional and working under pressure are all skills Kenny has perfected over the years, particularly in some of his operational deployments. He explained: “During my military career I have been exposed to a diverse and testing range of clinical situations involving patients with complex emergency needs, often in an austere environment. I have slept in a desert and built a tented mash style hospital from scratch, and my clinical, managerial and leadership skills have developed throughout this time.

“In 2011 I was the senior nurse in charge of Camp Bastion Accident and Emergency which was at the time one of the busiest trauma centres in the world. I managed situations involving complex medical and trauma patients, and have learnt a great deal of transferable skills through these experiences. I will never forget my operational experiences as well as the patients I nursed and supported. All of the reservists I worked with on operations were ordinary people doing extraordinary things, for me this encapsulates what being a reservist is all about; stepping up to the line and accomplishing amazing things in testing times”.

Phil Bolton, Divisional Head of Nursing, Emergency Care and Medicine, said: “Hospitals rely on staff with a range of experiences, particularly in emergency medicine and in busy accident and emergency departments.

“I’m sure front line medicine at King’s Mill is a long way from life at Camp Bastion but Kenny’s time with the military means we have someone who has learned leadership skills and how to handle difficult situations with skill and ingenuity. Being able to cope with the unexpected is vital.”

John Wilson, the Ministry of Defence’s Regional Employer Engagement Director, said: “Reservists play a key role in our Armed Forces and each year they undertake valuable personal development training that would cost thousands of pounds in a civilian environment. In Kenny’s case, it is clear that practical and clinical skills honed in operational situations have been of great value in his NHS environment.”

“Specialising in emergency medicine in my civilian career means that I treat patients of all ages who have a wide range of clinical problems. I examine, prescribe and refer them to the appropriate clinical discipline, or discharge them as appropriate. This is a huge responsibility and I always strive to do a first class job.”