NEWS

JULY 14TH 2020

INTERNATIONAL BOMBER COMMAND CENTRE REOPENING

The International Bomber Command Centre

The International Bomber Command Centre opens 21st July

The International Bomber Command Centre (IBCC), located at Canwick Ave, Lincoln, is due to re-open to the public on Tuesday 21st July, after a lengthy 4 months of closed doors due to government COVID-19 restrictions.

The IBCC will have social distancing and hygiene measures in place to ensure the safety of the public, to see more details on COVID-19 reopening plans visit: internationalbcc.co.uk/your-visit-events/covid-plans/

As part of the safety measures in place, timed entries will be allocated to the centre, as well as prepaid parking which will both need to be booked in advance through the IBCC website or over the phone at: 01522 514755.

About the Bomber Command

During WWII, more than a million men and women served, or supported, Bomber Command. Originating in 60 nations across the world, most coming from the UK and commonwealth. Of the 125,000 Aircrew who served, 72% were killed, seriously injured or taken Prisoner of War.

In a similar way to our current Reserve Forces, each Bomber Command was a volunteer. More than 44% were killed whilst serving, giving the highest rate of attrition of any Allied unit. The average age of death was only 23.

The aim of the IBCC is to preserve and tell the stories of all those who served in, supported the efforts of, or suffered as a result of the activities of Bomber Command during The Second World War.

Memories of Bomber Command are an example of difficult heritage because opinions about the bombing war can be divided. However, reconciliation is a key message of the IBCC; the policy of their archive is to be non-judgemental and to present a wide variety of experiences and testimonies.

archive source locations

Each dot marks the geographical location of at least one item in the IBCC archive.

What to explore

The Spire

On arrival you will see a towering monument at the heart of the IBCC called ‘The Spire’. Designed by Stephan Palmer OF Place Architecture ‘The Spire’ is a memorial with a focus on the city’s ancient Cathedral, which served as a sighting point for crews flying from Lincolnshire. For many men named on the accompanying walls, the Cathedral provided their last sight of Britain.

The Spire

The Spire

The Wall of Names

The Wall of Names is dedicated to the 58,000 men and women that lost their lives serving or in support of the Bomber Command during WWII. The 271 panels make up the wall surrounding ‘The Spire’ in a series of circles framing the view of the City and The Cathedral.

The Wall of Names

The Wall of Names

Peace Gardens

The IBCC features two beautiful Peace Gardens set across 10 archers of landscape ground, all free to access. The gardens include 27 native trees, each marking an operational Command Station in Britain at the time of the War.

The Peace Gardens

The Peace Gardens

The Archives

The IBCC achieves will provides you with an in-depth view of the Bomber Command and give you a first person perspective of their role in WWII. With a recorded 1123 oral history interviews. Almost 900 are now publicly available in the archive, and 775 of these have been transcribed. Over 170 logbooks have now been described and published.

A Bomber Command unit

A Bomber Command unit

To book your visit to the International Bomber Command Centre visit the IBCC website or book over the phone at: 01522 514755.